Water Falls From About 3,505 Meters Below Sea Level, Making It The Largest Waterfall In The World

Water Falls From About 3,505 Meters Below Sea Level, Making It The Largest Waterfall In The World

The Denmark Strait cascade is a sizable waterfall located in the ocean between Greenland and Iceland. The drop from the Greenland Sea to the Irminger Sea is 11,500 feet (3,505 meters), and it is extraordinarily wide, spanning 100 miles (160 km).

This underwater waterfall has a flow rate significantly higher than any waterfall on land, at over 175 million cubic feet (5 million cubic metres) per second. Even well-known waterfalls like Niagara Falls and Angel Falls in Venezuela contain a lot less water in contrast.

The idea that an underwater waterfall can exist at all makes the Denmark Strait Cataract even more amazing than its size. Seawater is actually quite active, contrary to the allure of seeing the ocean as a giant bathtub with tides splashing around.

On both broad and small scales, various temperatures and salinities, which alter the density of the water, are continually interacting. The significant temperature difference between the Arctic waters of the Greenland Sea and the slightly milder waters of the Irminger Sea causes the formation of the Denmark Strait cataract.

Due to the less active and smaller molecules of cold water, it is denser than warm water. Due to its higher density, the ice-cold water from the Greenland Sea falls more quickly to the ocean floor than the somewhat warmer water from the Irminger Sea.

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